Some tips for photographing the iconic Antelope Canyons

Some tips for photographing the iconic Antelope Canyons

I had an opportunity to do a multi stop photo vacation in Utah and Arizona (this past April) which included both the Upper and Lower Antelope Canyons (Page, Ariz).  For many years, I’ve enjoyed wonderful images from this area and figured I’d check it out on route from Zion to the Grand Canyon. Very very worth it!!! Below is offer some advice for photo-bugs looking to enjoy the wonderful scenery and come back with some spectacular shots: Where to start (about 10:15am): Lower Antelope Canyon offers the unique ability for “serious photographers” to take self guided tours. A serious photographer means you show up with a tripod and and SLR (not kidding you need both). That gives you the right to pay about $20 more for admission and tour the canyon by yourself! For two vs. one hours (with a group). Not kidding folks. I was walking around the canyon, enjoying the solitude and taking my time grabbing tremendous photos, while two groups of tourists (each with about 16 people) were tripping over each other to get a good view of the site. All I had to do was go someplace, where the groups weren’t and enjoy myself!! On to equipment/how to: To get great photos, you’ll need to shoot long exposures (for sufficient depth of field) which will allow you to use smaller apertures (f8-f11/16). Remember to bring a manual shutter release. As for lens selection (wider is better). Most of my shots were taken with a 16-40mm Canon L series lens (with a warming polarizer) and a full frame SLR (Canon 6d). Don’t think about changing lenses...
Celestial Photography at Arches!

Celestial Photography at Arches!

Just returned from 10 day biking/hiking trip to Steamboat Co.  Had the opportunity to do a great side trip to Arches National Park (outside of Moab Utah) and grab some great shots of the spectacular/iconic rock formations against the backdrop of the Milkyway Galaxy! I started shooting about 10:30pm when twilight had receded and the night sky was in full bloom.  For you tech-heads out there….here’s how I grabbed these images: I used a full frame SLR with a very fast fixed focal length lens (Canon 6d and Rokinon 16mm f 2.8). The Camera was mounted on a tripod, with the lens held open for approx 25 seconds (F2.8 @ 2000 ISO).  Long enough to get a proper exposure, short enough to avoid star trails.  Ie. the stars rotate around the North Stars….if you leave the lens open too long…you get streaks. I illuminated the rock formations using two techniques.  A.  I started using LCD flashlight with colored gels…to bring out the natural color of the rock.  I typically positioned the camera in front of the arch, then painted the arch with light from the side.  I trigged the camera using a remote blue-tooth shutter release.  B.  When the moon came out later in the evening, I used that as the additional light source.         Share...